Aug 13, 2016

10 More TV Hunks I've Never Heard Of

TV is proliferating with hunks these days, and they don't need much of an excuse to take off their clothes.  Here are 10  more tv hunks that I've never heard of, but would like to.

1. Barrett Carnahan.

2. B. J. Britt.  Forget about the Britt; let's concentrate on the B. J.

3. Dante Swain

4, Justin Prentice

5. Matthew Josten.  He looks a lot like Justin Prentice's younger brother.

6. Nick Roux.  How do you get such veiny wrists?

7. Ryan Wynott

8. Sam Claflin.

9. Tony Goldwyn

10.  Vladimir Furkit.  Forget the Vladimir, let's talk about the Furkit

I have got to start watching more tv.

Dating an Amputee

Do you find this guy attractive primarily because of:
1. His face
2. His physique
3. His missing right leg

Most people find #3 neutral or even a turn-off, but for a surprising number, it's a big plus, making him infinitely more attractive than guys with four limbs.

The absence makes the whole body stand out in vivid detail, drawing our attention to every muscle.

The lack of symmetry brings a pleasant dissonance, like a minor chord in music.

We're not supposed to look, not supposed to notice; when looking is forbidden, it becomes erotic.

A fetish is a primary erotic interest in an object or part of the human body other than the sex organs.  Acrotomophilia, the amputee fetish, is all about the absence.

Most amputee fetishists prefer guys with a single missing or shortened limb.

Some prefer double missing limbs, two arms, two legs, or one of each.

A smaller but still significant number prefer four missing limbs.

They can be quite specific about how much of the limb should be missing for optional erotic potential.

Whatever type they find preferable, partners are hard to come by.

Although there are nearly 2 million amputees in the U.S., over half are elderly diabetics with a host of medical issues, probably not interested in erotic exploration.  Less than half have lost limbs due to accidents.

Another 100,000 people were born with limb loss or limb difference, due to a variety of genetic and prenatal factors.

It works out to about 50,000 gay adult men with missing limbs and no significant medical problems that would preclude dating.

With a combination of prosthetic limbs and innovative mobility techniques, amputees can do everything anyone else can do, including drive a car, swim, and lift weights.  There's a guy who goes to my gym who is missing most of an arm, yet has fully defined, symmetrical pecs and shoulders.

There have been very few amputees working in movies and on tv.  The sitcom My Name is Earl was remarkable in having two amputee characters:

Didi (Tracey Ashton), one of the people Earl had wronged ("stole the car of a one-legged girl).

Plus her boyfriend, played by Cameron Clapp, a triple-amputee athlete and motivational speaker (seen here surfing).

The Amputee Coalition offers support groups and assistance to help amputees and their families and friends live to the fullest.  One of its activities is the Paddy Rossbach Youth Camp, a traditional summer camp founded in 2000  that has served  790 children with limb loss and limb difference from the U.S., Britain, Australia, Mexico, and Tunisia.

How do amputees feel about fetishists, people who are intensely attracted to them because of missing or reduced limb?

Some like the attention -- anything that makes you stand apart from the crowd is a good thing, right?

Most dislike being objectified, reduced to only an amputee, just as guys dislike being sought after simply because they are Asian or black, or have large penises.  They want to be desired for their  face and physique, their eccentricities and quirks, their accomplishments, their intelligence, their sense of humor, and everything else that makes them unique.

An uncensored version of this article, with nude photos, is on Tales of West Hollywood.

Aug 12, 2016

10 TV Hunks I've Never Heard Of

Back in the 1970s, if there was a hunk on tv, you knew about him.  His few shirtless photos became common knowledge, part of our shared gay memory.  But today, every actor goes to the gym and rips off his shirt regularly.  And with the proliferation of tv shows on cable networks and websites, you can't possibly hear about everyone.

Here are 10 celebrities who I somehow managed to acquire shirtless photos of, although I know nothing about them except that they are, or were, on tv.

1. Andrew Triscitta.

2. Casey Moss.  He seems to be an underwear model.

3. Collins Pennie.  I have four shirtless photos of this guy.

4. Craig Horner.  Must be a sword-and-sorcery program.

5. Daniel Hennie

6. Garrett Weston. Another underwear model?

7. Gisondo Skyler.

8. Guy Wilson

9. Jared Kusnitz. He's on MTV.

10. Jeremy Irving

Aug 11, 2016

Cameron Mathison: Gay Content and Abs

Have you ever heard of Cameron Mathison?

Me, neither.

When I saw this black-and-white photo of the muscleman with an old-fashioned swimsuit and hairstyle, I figured he must be a 1950s beefcake star, like Troy Donahue or Rock Hudson, maybe one of Henry Willson's stable of gay and gay-friendly actors hired for their physique rather than for their background in The Taming of the Shrew.

But I thought I had covered almost all of them, even the most obscure.

Turns out this guy was born in 1969: this is a faux-retro photo from the 1990s.

He grew up in Canada, and graduate from McGill University with a degree in engineering.  After appearing in a few movies, he landed a plum role as con man Ryan Lavery on the soap All My Children.  He appeared from 1998 to 2011, with a year off.

At the same time he was a correspondent for Good Morning, America, working on the Oscars, the Golden Globes, and other events, and interviewing celebrities from Mario Lopez to Wolfgang Puck.

In 2015 he began starring in a series of movies based on the Murder, She Baked novels, as Mike Kingston, boyfriend of the small-town baker turned sleuth.

Any gay content?  Oh, I don't know.  Look at those abs.

How have I not heard of this guy before?

Ok, ok, he plays a gay character in 54 (1998), with Ryan Philippe (with a gay kiss edited out), and Getty Images has some pictures of him at the Gay and Lesbian Film Festival in L.A. in 2011.

That's enough gay content for me.

By the way, he has a brother, Scott.  I want to know more about him, too.

Aug 10, 2016

Peter Pat, the Preteen Powerhouse with Plentiful Pro-Gay Plotlines

I've never heard of Peter Pat, but who wouldn't want to read about a toddler with an adult head beating up a loincloth-clad gorilla?

Apparently he was the star of a newspaper comic strip launched in 1934 by someone named Mo Leff.  It lasted only a year, but was reprinted in comic books in both the United States and France.

Peter Pat, aka just Pat, was carried off by a winged warrior to Pagoland, a sword-and-sorcery fantasy world, where he proved to be a superb fighter -- for a three year old.

Notice that there are no word balloons. Descriptions and dialogue appear at random places in the panel.

What's up with the oversized Dick Tracey head?

Pat has a sidekick named Pom, a even younger toddler (is he wearing a diaper?) with an old man's head.

Is Mo Leff just inept, or is there some reason for this weird phenomenon?  Maybe in Pagoland heads get older and bodies get younger.

Pat displayed a respectable teenage physique, but the giant head grafted onto his body would probably deter all but the most avid beefcake fans.

I don't know why his shorts and belt changed color.

The people of Pagoland had a preference for "p" sounds.  Pat's prim pony Pepper promenades in Pagoland pastures.

Mo Leff was also the ghostwriter for the Joe Palooka strip.

The Rubaiyat of Omar Khayyam

The Rubaiyat of Omar Khayyam is probably the most famous work of Middle Eastern literature worldwide, except maybe The Arabian Nights.   You're probably familiar with some of the passages.  But do you know what the poem is about?

Omar Khayyam (1048-1131) was a Persian poet, astronomer, and mathematician who may or may not have written the ruibaiyat (4-lined verses)  ascribed to him.  The compilation came three hundred years after his death.

It became famous in the English-speaking world with the translation by Edward FitzGerald (1809-1883), based on original manuscripts in the Oxford Bodleian Library.  The first edition (1859) contained 75 quatrains.  New editions increased the number to 101.

The plot is simple: a scholar abandons his studies for a romantic interlude with a young friend.

Here with a Loaf of Bread beneath the Bough,
A Flask of Wine, a Book of Verse - and Thou
Beside me singing in the Wilderness -
And Wilderness is Paradise enow.

After all, life is short: we should seize the day:

Ah, make the most of what we yet may spend,
Before we too into the Dust descend;
Dust into Dust, and under Dust, to lie,
Sans Wine, sans Song, sans Singer, and - sans End !

Who is the Poet seizing the day with?  Translators and illustrators tried their hardest to make it a heterosexual romance, but some of the quatrains describe a young man.

Up, smooth-faced boy!  The daybreak shines for thee!

Translator Edward FitzGerald was gay.  He was with William Kenilworthe Browne from 1832 to 1859, in spite of their both being married.  His romance with his second lover, a fisherman named Joseph Fletcher, or Posh, lasted from 1865 to 1873.

Aug 9, 2016

The Loud House: Gay Dads on Nickelodeon

The Loud House is a Nickelodeon cartoon not connected to the Loud Family that introduced gay people to PBS back in the 1970s.  

It was created by Chris Savino, who previously worked on such gay-context classics as Rocko's Modern Life, Dexter's Laboratory, and My Gym Partner's a Monkey.  It's a naturalistic series about a contemporary Michigan family with a husband (Brian Stepanek), wife (Jill Talley), and ten daughters, all apparently biological progeny: Lori, Leni, Luna, Luan, Lynn, Lucy, Lana, Lola, Lisa, Lily.  

And one son, the central character, 11-year old Lincoln Loud (Grant Palmer, left).

You might expect a lot of "battle of the sexes" plotlines, with stereotypic boys and girls fighting it out over pink ponies and baseball practice.  But conflicts are mostly about the sheer size of the group:
Lincoln wants to sit at the "adult" table at dinner.
Lincoln struggles to get a favorable seat in the van for a family trip.
Lincoln buys headphones to drown out the noise in the house.

There are few boy-girl dating plotlines, but few gay-subtext plotlines either.  Lincoln has a best friend, Clyde McBride (Caleel Harris), with a standard preteen bromance going on.

But Clyde has two Dads, Howard and Harold McBride, the first male-same sex couple to appear as a couple in any children's program in the U.S.

They are not a stereotyped fey gay couple: one is tall and thin, the other chubby and balding.  

Nor do they appear just once, for shock value, and then never again. They have appeared in at least four episodes, and been referenced in more, a standard part of the Loud House world.

They are voiced by Michael McDonald and Wayne Brady, comedians who have played gay characters in live productions, and are probably aware that they are making history, even if the kids watching are not.

The Tripods on TV

John Christopher's Tripod series (The White Mountains, The City of Gold and Lead, The Pool of Fire) was one of my childhood favorites, so I eagerly watched the 1984-85 British TV series when it appeared on PBS, part of the British invasion that also included Doctor Who, The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy, Monty Python's Flying Circus, The Tomorrow People, and The Prisoner).

The plot was about the same: in a dystopian future, people live under the thrall of the tripods.  On their 16th birthday, teenagers are capped with mind-control devices so they won't rebel.  Will  (John Shackley, left) decides to flee to the White Mountains (the present-day Alps), where he can be free.  He brings two companions, his cousin Henry (Jim Baker, center) and a French boy named Beanpole, or Jean-Paul (Ceri Seele, right).

When they reach the White Mountains, Will and the German boy Fritz (Robin Hayter) are sent out on a reconnaissance mission to a tripod city.

But the differences were depressing.

There is an extraordinary amount of beefcake, but the heterosexism is rapant.

In the book, a homoromantic bond is Will's motive for trying to escape: Jack, a few months older, has been capped and no longer cares for him.  In the tv series, the homoromance is absence.

In the book, Will briefly considers staying at the Chateau Ricordeau in France, where everyone is very nice to him -- he could have a "normal" life instead of always running.  He meets a girl named Eloise, but they are just friends.  In the novel, Will falls in love with Eloise and decides to marry her. There's an entire romantic plotline.

Beanpole is also given a heterosexual romance.

In the book, Will infiltrates one of the tripod cities, along with his German friend Fritz.  They have an intense, passionate, homoromantic friendship.  But in the tv series, they are coworkers and acquaintances, nothing more.

During the 1980s Reagan-Thatcher era of conservative retrenchment, homoromantic subtexts were rare, and the "fade out kiss" emphasized even more aggressively than in the 1970s.  So I should have expected it.  But I didn't.  After a few episodes, I stopped watching.

None of the principal actors has continued in show business.  Today John Shackley and his wife live in Chile, where he works in hotel management.

Aug 8, 2016

Michael J. Pollard, Lost Boy

When I was a kid in the 1960s, I thought Michael J. Pollard was the cutest guy around.  He was short, husky, and blond (I thought), with an impish smile. And he always played lost boys.

I first saw him in "The Magic Mirror" (1966), an episode of Lost in Space, playing a boy trapped in the mysterious world on the other side of a mirror.

And then in "Miri," an episode of Star Trek (1966), as the leader of a group of kids trapped in a perpetual childhood.

And then in "The Scene," an episode of The Danny Thomas Hour about a girl lost in the psychedelic world of the hippies.  He played her hippie friend.

He befriended girls, but never displayed any romantic interest in them.  Maybe he liked boys!

Years later, I saw some of his more serious roles, where Michael used his boyish quirks to play man-childs, sometimes affecting, sometimes dangerous and deranged.

In Bonnie and Clyde (1967), Michael played C. W. Moss, who befriends the criminal duo (Warren Beatty, Faye Dunaway) and has a rather obvious crush on Clyde.

In Little Fauss and Big Halsey (1970), he is the inept, childish motorcycle racer Little Fauss who can barely contain his crush on the superstar Big Halsey (Robert Redford).

Dirty Little Billy (1972) is an unromantic portrayal of Billy the Kid (Michael) as a leering psycho.

Off camera, he was a leather-jacket rebel. Once when he was in Morocco with Jim Capaldi, he helped write the lyrics for "Low Spark of High-Heeled Boys," a gay-themed song recorded by Traffic (1971).

If I gave you everything that I owned and asked for nothing in return
Would you do the same for me as I would for you?
Or take me for a ride, and strip me of everything including my pride
But spirit is something that no one destroys
And the sound that I'm hearing is only the sound
The low spark of high-heeled boys

I don't know if he is gay or bisexual in real life, though he was married to actress Beth Howland (of Alice) from 1961 to 1969.

Actor Michael Andrew Fox changed to Michael J. Fox as a homage to Michael J. Pollard.

I haven't seen much of Michael's more recent work, though I understand that he's still playing mostly hippies, psychos, and man-childs, and in a humorous turn, the mischievous transdimensional Mr. Mxyzptik on Superboy.

Here he is recently.  An elderly, white-haired gentleman with an impish grin and a black leather jacket. I'd date him.

But I'll always remember the Lost Boy of my childhood.

See also: Lost in Space


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